The REAL Reason Home Furnishings Customers are Leaving Your Website: Engagement!

The REAL Reason Home Furnishings Customers are Leaving Your Website: Engagement!

[vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_column_text]Many eCommerce websites really only possess a shopping cart. However, there’s so much more that’s involved with having an eCommerce platform. In order to have a proper eCommerce website, you must have a website platform that makes it easy for online shoppers to find exactly what they’re looking for. Unfortunately, many folks in the home furnishings industry don’t do very well at all.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]I speak to many home furnishings retailers about helping them with their marketing, and the first area I review is their website. If their website isn’t informational (meaning, it doesn’t possess resources or products many consumers look for), I explain that spending money to attract and engage consumers is likely to be wasted simply because consumers are trained to search, find and buy with ease. And if your consumers can’t find what they’re looking for, that money is spent in vain.

 

Often times, I still hear that retailers don’t want to show prices for fear of their competition knowing their pricing — or worse — being show-roomed (going to a brick-and-mortar store to look at a product before buying it online for a cheaper price). Well, it’s not showrooming anymore, it’s “web-rooming,” and if handled correctly, it can be a real asset. [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]furniture tracking illustration[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]Statistics have proven that consumers want to buy locally, but if you don’t show your pricing and consumers have the ability to buy it online, then guess what? They buy from someone else and that’s usually the big eCommerce giant.  

 

The answer to this dilemma is simple. Offer a Price-Matching guarantee. A simple note of “YOU WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD” on the same product/SKU, delivered to the same zip code can have a huge impact. I don’t know about you, but I’d rather make 30% of something than 100% of nothing.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]furniture ecommerce trends - break image[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]Lastly, think about this as it pertains to how YOU shop. Here’s a scenario that’s probably familiar: Let’s say  you visit a store, saw something you liked but for whatever reason, you didn’t buy it. Then a week or a month later you decided it was time and wanted to buy it immediately. Would you get back into your car, fight traffic, wait for a salesperson and spend all that time and energy to purchase it, or would you go online to the store, make two-three clicks and be done with it in less than 5 minutes?

 

In summation, if approximately 32% of all home furnishings purchases are going to be sold online, why wouldn’t you want your business to be part of that statistic?

 

Sadly, there are many independent retailers that don’t want to participate and that is one major reason why so many home furnishing retailers have lost thousands and thousands of storefronts over the last 10 years. Unless we embrace the reality of change, this trend will only continue.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Furniture eCommerce Trends: How Retailers Can Compete with eCommerce Giants

Furniture eCommerce Trends: How Retailers Can Compete with eCommerce Giants

[vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_column_text]In my last post, I offered up some interesting statistics regarding eCommerce as it relates to the furniture industry. I expect some of my readers will challenge these numbers because they include home furnishings and not just furniture. My answer is a question: Do you just sell furniture, or are you a destination stop “for everything for the home.”

 

The reason I ask that question relates directly to the reasons why people shop for “the home” at brick and mortar stores like Crate and Barrel, Target, Ikea and other national retailers. They are looking for those unique and stylish home accessories and accent items that “complete” their look of a specific room. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]With that said, do you showcase your home accent buyers on your website? If not, then you should! Just refer back to the statistic that over $42 Billion of our category sales will be done online. It’s also a great way to keep online buyers engaged on your website.

 

Add to these statistics the 800-pound eCommerce giant, Amazon. According to data floating around the internet, Amazon’s furniture sales were estimated at $4 Billion in 2017, representing a 51% increase year over year. Additionally, Amazon has created Amazon Home, which enables customers to shop by room, look, home decor, specific items or category.
[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]furniture ecommerce trends - break image[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]In addition to Amazon, we have Wayfair, Overstock, Hayneedle and more taking business from you. After reviewing the facts, do you really think you can survive in retail if you don’t have an e-commerce strategy and platform that offers a multitude of products that are at least relevant to furniture?

 

Our industry overall is expected to grow to $114BN in 2018, a 4.9% increase which is very good. Naturally, if I was a retailer, I’d want more. I’d want Amazon’s growth!  Of course, to get that kind of growth, , one would have to possess thousands and thousands of SKU’s (or products) on their website_ essentially, a ton of different products. If they don’t, they’re doomed to be replaced by retailers who do. [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Why Home Furnishing Retailers Need to Care About eCommerce on their Own Sites

Why Home Furnishing Retailers Need to Care About eCommerce on their Own Sites

[vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_column_text]I live in Arcadia, Wisconsin in the middle of nowhere and I love it. Many think I’m crazy, as I’m missing on city conveniences like great restaurants, and a variety of shopping options and experiences.

 

Ok, I admit it… I do miss the restaurant options, but that’s about it. When I go to the Las Vegas Furniture Market, my first dinner is always a New York Deli in one of the hotels; because where I live, Walmart is the closest thing to a deli I have. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]When it comes to shopping and buying stuff, I don’t miss the city life at all. I hate traffic and trying to find a place to park. I also hate how after all that hassle, I’m unable to find the right product at a decent price to entice me to “buy.” Then I’m off on my next brick and mortar journey, hoping that I’ll eventually find what I’m looking for.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]I’m a Baby Boomer. I buy about 85% of everything “online” and I’m on a first name basis with my UPS and FedEx drivers. I buy online for two simple reasons:

 

  1. As I mentioned, I hate the hassle and the process of “the hunt.”
  2. E-commerce shopping and buying it “my way” makes my life easy.

[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]I bet when you are looking at virtually any type of purchase, you start by searching for something on Google, and you find an assortment of different businesses pertaining to what you searched for — many of them being local businesses.  

 

The next step is to visit those online retailers who matched your search. You review their website and you want to know how much their product/service costs? If there isn’t a price, I can virtually guarantee, you’ll leave that website and go to the next one. [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]home furnishing retailers - break image[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_column_text]This is step one in failing your consumer: NO PRICING on your website. No one will call you to ask for a price. Hardly anyone calls anyone anymore, but they do email and/or text. Ask yourself this: would you call anyone to ask for a price on anything? If not, why would you expect your customers to call you?

 

If you are unable to buy what you want when you want it, what do you do? You search for the buying option(s) where you can buy it.

 

According to Statistica, e-commerce sales have grown by one third in two years. In 2016. total U.S. e-commerce sales were over $360 Billion and projected to be over $461 Billion in 2018. By 2022, however, e-commerce sales are expected to surpass $638 Billion in sales; almost double in from the 2016 sales statistics.
[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern”][vc_column][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]When it comes to furniture and home furnishings e-commerce revenue, Statistica reported that in 2013, furniture/home furnishings e-commerce revenue was over $20 Billion and is projected to be over $42 Billion in 2019. It is also projected that by 2021 furniture/home furnishings will account for 13.6% of ALL retail e-commerce sales.

 

Statistica isn’t alone! In 2016, Business Insider projected that by 2020, over 32% of ALL home furnishings will be sold online.

 

Even though there are many consumers who still prefer to come in to make a purchase after months of online research, the ultimate goal of eCommerce sites is to give consumers as many resources as possible — bringing them close to an actual purpose.
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Why you MUST Show Furniture Pricing on your Website. PERIOD.

Why you MUST Show Furniture Pricing on your Website. PERIOD.

I can’t tell you how many conversations I’ve had with retailers on the subject of revealing prices on your website.. There are two main reasons they don’t want to do this.

 

The first reason:

 

“I don’t want my competition knowing my pricing and I don’t want the consumer to showroom/webroom me.”

 

The second reason: “I don’t want to sell online, or do special orders.”

 

My answers are predictably the same: Your competitors probably already know your pricing because they probably shop your store. And two, why would you not want alienate potential customers and not increase your sales volume?

 

Statista reports that 24.19MM consumers bought furniture online.They did it because the products had pricing on the website so they could decide if they could afford it. You may think that’s only 7.5% of the population, but if you look at this number (as it relates to the population) and you can consider an actual “buying customer”, that number percentage jumps dramatically to 16.5%.

 

And according to eMarketer, “Retail ecommerce sales of furniture and home furnishings will grow 16.4% in 2017 to reach $35.95 billion and will total $62.36 billion by 2021.”

 

If you continue to want to buck the trend, you will lose business because you’re failing at providing what the customer wants. Here’s why!

 

“If you don’t see what an item costs on a website, you move on to a website that does show pricing.”

 

When was the last time you called a store and asked them what something on their website cost? You probably didn’t. Instead, you likely right clicked the image and saved it to your desktop or copied the image URL, and pasted it into Google image search.

 

Once you do that, all you have to do is click “Shopping” and you guessed it, the product, the manufacturer, the pricing and what retailers are selling the item pops up in your search results.

 

How do you shop online? I’ll bet if you don’t see what an item costs on a website, you move on to a website that does show pricing. If the price is fair and you want it, you buy it. You don’t go back to that store and call them for their price.

 

As for the commerce excuse, virtually every web provider has an ecommerce solution built into it. You can do one-off orders, or you can integrate it into your P.O.S. system. Sure, it takes time and costs money, but a lot less money than losing over 25% of the buyers out there that are buying online.

 

Math is hard. This isn’t.

 

So, let’s address the elephant in the room about pricing on your website. I often hear retailers say: “I don’t want my competitors to see my pricing”, or “I don’t want the consumer to ‘price shop me’ via showrooming or webrooming.”

 

My position is straightforward: put everything you have open to buy on your site. Yes, thousands of SKUs and price them all.

 

More than 80% of consumers want to buy local. When they search, and you don’t have what they’re looking for, their search results divert to those companies that do: Wayfair, Amazon, Houzz, Overstock and others that have thousands, if not millions of SKUs, that are all transparently priced and easy to buy online.

 

You may say that you don’t do special order, but consider all those companies I just listed only do special order and they sell a ton more stuff than you do.

 

Deflecting the Webroom/Showroom Problem

 

Place a banner on your website, or a video, stating, “We will match any price on any product with the exact same SKU delivered into our market.” My thinking is that if you do have to match a price, making 30% of something, is a lot more profitable than making 50% of nothing.

 

Five years ago, Best Buy was considered “toast” when it came to competing with Amazon. Most analysts gave up on them. What ended up happening is they implemented a price match guarantee and their business took off. As of March 2018, they’ve had great earnings.

 

People want to shop local. They want to see what they are considering buying, and see what it will cost instantly. In Best Buy’s case, that was televisions, computers, appliances and other high-ticket items much like furniture.

The Evolution of Furniture Websites… or Lack Thereof

The Evolution of Furniture Websites… or Lack Thereof

[vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css=”.vc_custom_1521226682387{padding-top: 25px !important;padding-bottom: 25px !important;}” z_index=””][vc_column][vc_column_text]While retailers have slowly embraced furniture websites and made changes, they’re still not engaging online visitors like they should be to increase sales. Follow the history of furniture websites and learn how to embrace your website better to see results.

 

It wasn’t until recently that website providers amped up their game. With huge technological improvements, the cost for a retailer to build and maintain a website has dropped dramatically, while the options for a better experience for the consumer has improved. The main problem that exists today with furniture websites is they ignore the primary reason for their existence: a defined process to engage visitors, increase their time on site, to create leads and sell lots of stuff, either in-store or online.

 

When you think about it, there are basically three things you can accomplish with the Internet: search for stuff, find stuff and buy/sell stuff. Retailers use their websites to get found, engage with their customers, and get solid leads to make a purchase. Duncan Hines is a good example by asking their online visitors a question: What do you want to bake today? They immediately engage visitors with a question.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css=”.vc_custom_1521237431822{padding-top: 15px !important;padding-bottom: 25px !important;}” z_index=””][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1531336575224{padding-bottom: 25px !important;}”]

Early Furniture Websites Needed “Hits”

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1521729883283{padding-top: 25px !important;}”]Most everyone knows that Google transformed how we accomplish these three basic functions of search, find, buy/sell online.

 

When I entered the furniture industry directing the marketing for Ashley furniture, I remember the typical furniture website landing page had a logo, maybe a picture and a bunch of links.

 

I remember the typical furniture website landing page had a logo, maybe a picture and a bunch of links.

 

If there were pictures next to the links, they were usually the size of postage stamps. The pages were small because the operating systems were just beginning to evolve, many having only 256MB of ram, compared to the 4 to 8GB today.

 

In 2000, there were 282 million people in the U.S. and 121 million were wired for the Internet. The goal back then was to get traffic – “hits” to your furniture website with the hope that people would search out your brand/product and then visit your store to make the purchase.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css=”.vc_custom_1521237414253{padding-top: 15px !important;padding-bottom: 15px !important;}” z_index=””][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1531336586540{padding-bottom: 25px !important;}”]

Retailers Slowly Embrace Furniture Websites

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]The whole concept of search began to take hold in 2001-2002 with the introduction of Windows XP, which had a much faster operating system, better graphics and much more. This allowed companies to upgrade their websites with better images and content. Content was becoming critical because of Goggle’s search algorithms.

 

Coincidentally, Wayfair was founded in 2002 and Apple launched iTunes in 2003, along with peer to peer networks such as Napster and Skype. Soon video conferencing, video messaging and more took hold and social networking launched with websites like LinkedIn and MySpace, with Facebook soon following.

 

Around 2005 retailers started to embrace the web, although skeptically. There were a few companies that entered the category specializing in building furniture websites, yet most consisted of a landing page and maybe a few of their best selling pieces of furniture. It wasn’t cheap building a furniture website back then and the tools to do so were hard to find. The concept of selling furniture online was in its infancy and mostly dismissed.

 

Around 2007, the idea of selling online became a hot discussion. Coincidentally, Apple launched the first iPhone and the “mobile friendly” seed was planted. Also, the recession hit, and everything changed for the worse. Furniture retail fell off a cliff. Internet users decreased too, and the brick and mortar furniture store count began to decrease dramatically.

 

Most people said selling online would never happen, because you must see, touch, feel and sit on furniture. I knew different, because I was working as the CMO of a company that was selling $50 million/year to Costco who was only selling that product online. Yes, they had returns because of the color, touch, feel, etc., but that was around 7% and they built that into the price.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css=”.vc_custom_1521237414253{padding-top: 15px !important;padding-bottom: 15px !important;}” z_index=””][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1531336609345{padding-bottom: 25px !important;}”]

Content, SEO and “Style” Define Websites

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]I remember 2009 as the year furniture retailer websites started to become relevant. There really wasn’t a good argument anymore about not having a website because the percentage of Internet users doubled to 222 million users.

 

The problem for retailers was that there wasn’t any good content. When I say content, I mean “words.” Manufacturers had pictures, but relatively no content or “word descriptions” that could be found in search. Google doesn’t recognize pictures in search, just words: however with metadata today, that has changed.

 

Because of this, everyone was selling SEO packages, so your furniture website would get found. You couldn’t open an email program without a ton of people guaranteeing you “search results,” much like today when every other email is about selling digital marketing/AdWords so you’ll get found. But no one ever addressed how to engage people into a sales funnel that was quantitative, a problem that is still prolific today.

 

Back then and still today, if you Googled a search phrase only the website that had those words or part of that search phrase would be found. Retailers loaded their websites with pictures and the website providers started to implement a “Narrow Your Search” function by style which most still use today. The problem is that people don’t search by style, they search for “the look.” I always ask people … “What is a Transitional Style”? I have no clue, and everybody has different definitions of style, so this function makes no sense. Who makes those decisions anyway?

 

In 2012, the Internet started to explode, gaining 20 million new users in the U.S. in one year. To create a better experience, many web providers started to implement Save to Favorites, Sort by Price, What’s in Stock and a Room Planner that required a degree in design to figure out how to use it.

 

The website providers amped up their game and with huge technological improvements, the cost for a retailer to build and maintain a website came down dramatically, while the options for a better experience for the consumer improved. However, these websites still ignored the primary reason for their existence: a defined process to engage visitors, increase their time on site, to create leads and sell stuff.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css=”.vc_custom_1521237414253{padding-top: 15px !important;padding-bottom: 15px !important;}” z_index=””][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1531336644930{padding-bottom: 25px !important;}”]

Why Furniture Websites Still Don’t Meet Expectations

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]The look of furniture websites has dramatically improved, as have the navigation elements, but there are still a couple of major problems haunting retailers: Content and Engagement.

 

Retailers need to take steps to improve furniture websites. Furniture websites need content so your retailer will get found in search with “words/descriptions” because our industry manufacturers don’t invest in this. We all see such a proliferation of companies trying to sell us digital marketing/AdWords, much like they did 10 years ago with SEO packages, so you’ll get found, supposedly. Buyer beware, there is an absolute ton of fraud with BOTS and Click Farms in this arena.

 

The second and probably most profound failure is not getting people to engage on your furniture website. Once you spend all that money to get people to your website, then what? What’s your process? How do you work them through the sales funnel? A strategy of hope?

 

Consumers aren’t spending a lot of time on furniture retail websites, some less than a couple minutes and retailers are starting to question their web providers. Even though websites are prettier, much of the brief time on site issues can be attributed to a pedestrian user experience that hasn’t changed much in the last 5 years. No one searches by style, they search the look. No one helps/engages you through the search experience on your websites. It boils down to that word again – hope – hope they find it, hope they come to your store – hope for anything to happen.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation=”” row_type=”row” use_row_as_full_screen_section=”no” type=”full_width” angled_section=”no” text_align=”left” background_image_as_pattern=”without_pattern” css=”.vc_custom_1521237406917{padding-top: 15px !important;padding-bottom: 15px !important;}” z_index=””][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1531336666361{padding-bottom: 25px !important;}”]

Engaging Furniture Shoppers Online Today

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]A website needs to be your  no. 1 salesperson, or silent salesperson, and as such must act like one. It needs to HELP the consumer find what they are looking for and it needs to be done quickly and efficiently, especially when it comes to a mobile experience.

 

As a salesperson, why wouldn’t you ask the same questions on your website that you ask in person when someone comes to your store? You ask those questions to expedite the search and find function in your store for your customers, correct?

 

A website needs to be your  no. 1 salesperson, or silent salesperson, and as such must act like one.

 

The first question Duncan Hines asks when you go to their website: “What would you like to bake today”? They don’t talk about their company, they want to help people find what they are looking for … narrowing the search and find function. What’s the first question you ask your consumer when they visit your website?

 

Today there are 290 million people in the U.S. on the Internet, 87% of the population is wired. If you don’t engage your visitors with questions, how can you give them answers or solutions?

 

The goal of your website is to create actionable leads, helping people looking to buy furniture find what they want and buy it from you. If you don’t create that environment, your website just becomes a picture album with some pricing and that awful room planner that no one uses with a proven strategy that doesn’t work … HOPE![/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]